Does suppressing the thought of a self-relevant stigma affect interpersonal interaction?

Abstract

In the current study, we examined the effects of women's suppressing negative gender stereotypes while interacting with a male confederate. Compared with control participants, those who suppressed negative thoughts about women's ability experienced less self-confidence, lower self-esteem, and were more nonverbally submissive during the interaction, particularly if they were high in stigma consciousness (Pinel, 1999). These findings illustrate the negative intra- and interpersonal consequences of stigma suppression.

Cite this paper

@article{Borton2011DoesST, title={Does suppressing the thought of a self-relevant stigma affect interpersonal interaction?}, author={Jennifer L S Borton and David R Reiner and E. Vidal V{\'a}zquez and Jessica F Ruddiman and Stephanie M. Anglin}, journal={The Journal of social psychology}, year={2011}, volume={151 3}, pages={240-56} }