Does supernormal stimulus influence parental behaviour of the cuckoo's host?

@article{Grim2001DoesSS,
  title={Does supernormal stimulus influence parental behaviour of the cuckoo's host?},
  author={Tom{\'a}{\vs} Grim and Marcel Honza},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={49},
  pages={322-329}
}
  • T. Grim, M. Honza
  • Published 1 February 2001
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Abstract The supernormal stimulus hypothesis (SSH) states that a cuckoo chick should obtain more parental care than host young by means of exaggerated sensory signals. We tested the SSH by comparing parental care by reed warblers at parasitized and non-parasitized nests. A comparison of feeding rates to parasite and host chicks of the same size showed that parasitized nests received more food than non-parasitized ones with one host chick. There was an interesting relationship between average… 

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