Does previous participation in high-impact training result in residual bone gain in growing girls? One year follow-up of a 9-month jumping intervention.

@article{Kontulainen2002DoesPP,
  title={Does previous participation in high-impact training result in residual bone gain in growing girls? One year follow-up of a 9-month jumping intervention.},
  author={S A Kontulainen and P Kannus and Matti E. Pasanen and Harri Siev{\"a}nen and Ari Heinonen and Pekka Oja and Ilkka Vuori},
  journal={International journal of sports medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={23 8},
  pages={575-81}
}
The skeletal response to exercise and training on bone is exceptionally good during the growing years. However, it is not known whether the benefit of training on bone is maintained after the training. This 20-month follow-up study assessed the effect of a 9-month jumping intervention on bone gain and physical performance in 99 girls (mean age 12.5 +/- 1.5 years at the beginning of the study) one year after the end of the intervention. Both bone mineral content (BMC), by dual energy X-ray… CONTINUE READING

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