Does prenatal WIC participation improve birth outcomes? New evidence from Florida

@article{Figlio2009DoesPW,
  title={Does prenatal WIC participation improve birth outcomes? New evidence from Florida},
  author={David N. Figlio and Sarah Hamersma and Jeffrey Roth},
  journal={Journal of Public Economics},
  year={2009},
  volume={93},
  pages={235-245}
}

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have asked us to help readers make sense of the competingclaims about the efficacy of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program forWomen, Infants and Children (WIC) on pregnancy and birth outcomes
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