Does old age reduce the risk of anxiety and depression? A review of epidemiological studies across the adult life span

@article{Jorm2000DoesOA,
  title={Does old age reduce the risk of anxiety and depression? A review of epidemiological studies across the adult life span},
  author={Anthony F Jorm},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2000},
  volume={30},
  pages={11 - 22}
}
  • Anthony F Jorm
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Psychological Medicine
Background. There is considerable disagreement about what happens to the risk of anxiety and depression disorders and symptoms as people get older. Methods. A search was made for studies that examine the occurrence of anxiety, depression or general distress across the adult life span. To be included, a study had to involve a general population sample ranging in age from at least the 30s to 65 and over and use the same assessment method at each age. Results. There was no consistent pattern… Expand
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