Does low-energy sweetener consumption affect energy intake and body weight? A systematic review, including meta-analyses, of the evidence from human and animal studies

@article{Rogers2016DoesLS,
  title={Does low-energy sweetener consumption affect energy intake and body weight? A systematic review, including meta-analyses, of the evidence from human and animal studies},
  author={Peter J. Rogers and P S Hogenkamp and Cees de Graaf and Suzanne Higgs and Anne Lluch and Andrew Robert Ness and Christopher M Penfold and Ross Perry and Peter Putz and Martin R. Yeomans and David J. Mela},
  journal={International Journal of Obesity},
  year={2016},
  volume={40},
  pages={381-394}
}
By reducing energy density, low-energy sweeteners (LES) might be expected to reduce energy intake (EI) and body weight (BW). To assess the totality of the evidence testing the null hypothesis that LES exposure (versus sugars or unsweetened alternatives) has no effect on EI or BW, we conducted a systematic review of relevant studies in animals and humans consuming LES with ad libitum access to food energy. In 62 of 90 animal studies exposure to LES did not affect or decreased BW. Of 28 reporting… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 51 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 209 references

A pre-meal glucose drink, but not video game playing, suppresses food intake in overweight and obese boys (1040.8)

  • B Gheller, T Akhavan, D Pollard, B Gladanac, M Constantino, B Luhovyy
  • FASEB J
  • 2014

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…