Does lack of control lead to conspiracy beliefs? A meta‐analysis

@article{Stojanov2020DoesLO,
  title={Does lack of control lead to conspiracy beliefs? A meta‐analysis},
  author={Ana Stojanov and Jamin B. Halberstadt},
  journal={European Journal of Social Psychology},
  year={2020},
  volume={50},
  pages={955-968}
}
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The study aims to verify the level of conspiracy beliefs and the relationship of conspiracy beliefs with the conspiracy mentality and analytic cognitive style. A total of 470 participants (49.4%
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Does Perceived Lack of Control Lead to Conspiracy Theory Beliefs? Findings from an online MTurk sample
TLDR
Across six studies conducted online using MTurk samples, no effect of control manipulations on conspiracy theory beliefs are observed, while replicating previously reported correlational evidence of their association.
What breeds conspiracy antisemitism? The role of political uncontrollability and uncertainty in the belief in Jewish conspiracy.
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Belief in conspiracy theories is associated with negative outcomes such as political disengagement, prejudice, and environmental inaction, and the perception that others have conspired may therefore in some contexts lead to negative action rather than inaction.
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TLDR
Exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people not only increased prejudice towards this group but was indirectly associated with increase prejudice towards a number of secondary outgroups.
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