Does infant carrying promote attachment? An experimental study of the effects of increased physical contact on the development of attachment.

@article{Anisfeld1990DoesIC,
  title={Does infant carrying promote attachment? An experimental study of the effects of increased physical contact on the development of attachment.},
  author={E. Anisfeld and V. Casper and M. Nozyce and N. Cunningham},
  journal={Child development},
  year={1990},
  volume={61 5},
  pages={
          1617-27
        }
}
  • E. Anisfeld, V. Casper, +1 author N. Cunningham
  • Published 1990
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Child development
  • This study was designed to test the hypothesis that increased physical contact, experimentally induced, would promote greater maternal responsiveness and more secure attachment between infant and mother. Low-SES mothers of newborn infants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 23) that received soft baby carriers (more physical contact) or to a control group (n = 26) that received infants seats (less contact). Using a transitional probability analysis of a play session at 31/2… CONTINUE READING
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