Does consumer injury modify invasion impact?

@article{Delaney2011DoesCI,
  title={Does consumer injury modify invasion impact?},
  author={David G. Delaney and Blaine D. Griffen and Brian Leung},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2011},
  volume={13},
  pages={2935-2945}
}
Predicting the impacts of an invasive species solely by its abundance is common, yet it ignores other potentially important moderating factors. One such factor is injury. Severe injury can lead to mortality, which can directly reduce the abundance of the invader. However, more moderate, sublethal injury can also temper the impact of invasive species. Therefore, to predict impacts, it may be useful to examine not only abundance, but also moderating factors (e.g., injury) and predictors of these… 
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