Does chronic sunscreen use reduce vitamin D production to insufficient levels?

@article{Norval2009DoesCS,
  title={Does chronic sunscreen use reduce vitamin D production to insufficient levels?},
  author={Mary Norval and Hans Christian Wulf},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2009},
  volume={161}
}
  • M. Norval, H. Wulf
  • Published 1 October 2009
  • Medicine
  • British Journal of Dermatology
Exposure to ultraviolet B radiation in sunlight provides the mechanism for more than 90% of the vitamin D production in most individuals. Concern has been expressed in recent years that the widespread use of sunscreens, particularly those with high sun protection factors, may lead to a significant decrease in solar‐induced previtamin D3 in the skin, resulting in a vitamin D level which is considered insufficient for protection against a wide range of diseases. In this article the published… 
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It is concluded that sunscreen, in the manner used by the general public, does not cause vitamin D insufficiency, and no recommendation can be made that is both safe and accurate enough for general public usage.
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  • M. Bogh
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    Scandinavian journal of clinical and laboratory investigation. Supplementum
  • 2012
TLDR
This review focuses on aspects of UV-related and personal factors of importance for the cutaneous vitamin D production after UVB exposure.
Safe, mild ultraviolet‐B exposure: An essential human requirement for vitamin D and other vital bodily parameter adequacy: A review
  • J. Hawk
  • Medicine
    Photodermatology, photoimmunology & photomedicine
  • 2020
TLDR
Vitamin D adequacy needs just mild regular UVB skin exposure well under sunburning levels, unlikely to cause significant skin damage and blood pressure is reduced through low‐dose UVB‐induced production of the vasodilator nitric oxide.
Photoprotection and vitamin D status.
TLDR
The effect of photoprotection strategies and pigmentation on vitamin D status is reviewed and Clothing can clearly be very effective at inhibiting vitamin D synthesis.
Iatrogenic effects of photoprotection recommendations on skin cancer development, vitamin D levels, and general health.
TLDR
Current evidence supports the conclusion that protection from UV radiation reduces the incidence of skin cancers and photodamage, but generally does not compromise vitamin D status or lead to iatrogenic disease.
Evaluation of vitamin D plasma levels after mild exposure to the sun with photoprotection*
TLDR
Suberythemal sun exposure with sunscreen (SPF 30) provides similar vitamin D serum variation than without photoprotection in healthy adults, with statistically significant difference between CO and SC groups.
Photoprotection and vitamin D: a review
TLDR
An updated review of the literature emphasizes that adequate levels of vitamin D are needed to prevent osteoporosis, falls and fractures in the elderly population and patients should not be discouraged from normal usage of sunscreens due to their well‐established photoprotective effects.
[Vitamin D: evidence and controversies].
TLDR
The conclusion is that sun exposure should not be used as the only source of vitamin D given that it is also clearly carcinogenic for the skin.
[Vitamin D: evidence and controversies]
TLDR
The conclusion is that sun exposure should not be used as the only source of vitamin D given that it is also clearly carcinogenic for the skin.
The relation between skin disorders and vitamin D
  • H. Wulf
  • Medicine
    The British journal of dermatology
  • 2012
TLDR
A cohort of patients with untreated psoriasis has lower vitamin D levels than healthy control patients, and the effect of UVB on vitamin D formation is very individual, due to different vitamin DLevels at the initiation ofUVB treatment, and possibly because of genetic factors.
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