Does agricultural use of azole fungicides contribute to resistance in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus?

@article{Hollomon2017DoesAU,
  title={Does agricultural use of azole fungicides contribute to resistance in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus?},
  author={Derek W Hollomon},
  journal={Pest management science},
  year={2017},
  volume={73 10},
  pages={
          1987-1993
        }
}
  • D. Hollomon
  • Published 1 October 2017
  • Biology
  • Pest management science
Azole resistance in human fungal pathogens has increased over the past twenty years, especially in immunocompromised patients. Similarities between medical and agricultural azoles, and extensive azole (14α-demethylase inhibitor, DMI) use in crop protection, prompted speculation that resistance in patients with aspergillosis originated in the environment. Aspergillus species, and especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are the largest cause of patient deaths from fungi. Azole levels in soils following… 

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