Does Pathogen Spillover from Commercially Reared Bumble Bees Threaten Wild Pollinators?

@article{Otterstatter2008DoesPS,
  title={Does Pathogen Spillover from Commercially Reared Bumble Bees Threaten Wild Pollinators?},
  author={Michael C. Otterstatter and James D. Thomson},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2008},
  volume={3},
  pages={1224 - 1233}
}
The conservation of insect pollinators is drawing attention because of reported declines in bee species and the 'ecosystem services' they provide. This issue has been brought to a head by recent devastating losses of honey bees throughout North America (so called, 'Colony Collapse Disorder'); yet, we still have little understanding of the cause(s) of bee declines. Wild bumble bees (Bombus spp.) have also suffered serious declines and circumstantial evidence suggests that pathogen 'spillover… CONTINUE READING

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