Does Language Shape Thought?: Mandarin and English Speakers' Conceptions of Time

@article{Boroditsky2001DoesLS,
  title={Does Language Shape Thought?: Mandarin and English Speakers' Conceptions of Time},
  author={Lera Boroditsky},
  journal={Cognitive Psychology},
  year={2001},
  volume={43},
  pages={1-22}
}
  • L. Boroditsky
  • Published 1 August 2001
  • Linguistics
  • Cognitive Psychology
Does the language you speak affect how you think about the world? This question is taken up in three experiments. English and Mandarin talk about time differently--English predominantly talks about time as if it were horizontal, while Mandarin also commonly describes time as vertical. This difference between the two languages is reflected in the way their speakers think about time. In one study, Mandarin speakers tended to think about time vertically even when they were thinking for English… 
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Do English and Mandarin speakers think about time differently?
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