Does Incarceration Reduce Voting? Evidence about the Political Consequences of Spending Time in Prison

@article{Gerber2017DoesIR,
  title={Does Incarceration Reduce Voting? Evidence about the Political Consequences of Spending Time in Prison},
  author={Alan S. Gerber and Gregory A. Huber and Marc Meredith and Daniel R. Biggers and David J. Hendry},
  journal={The Journal of Politics},
  year={2017},
  volume={79},
  pages={1130 - 1146}
}
The rise in mass incarceration provides a growing impetus to understand the effect that interactions with the criminal justice system have on political participation. While a substantial body of prior research studies the political consequences of criminal disenfranchisement, less work examines why eligible ex-felons vote at very low rates. We use administrative data on voting and interactions with the criminal justice system from Pennsylvania to assess whether the association between… Expand
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Misdemeanor Disenfranchisement? The Demobilizing Effects of Brief Jail Spells on Potential Voters
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This paper presents new causal estimates of incarceration’s effect on voting, using administrative data on criminal sentencing and voter turnout. I use the random case assignment process of a majorExpand
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