Doc2 Is a Ca2+ Sensor Required for Asynchronous Neurotransmitter Release

@article{Yao2011Doc2IA,
  title={Doc2 Is a Ca2+ Sensor Required for Asynchronous Neurotransmitter Release},
  author={Jun Yao and J. D. Gaffaney and Sung E. Kwon and E. Chapman},
  journal={Cell},
  year={2011},
  volume={147},
  pages={666-677}
}
Synaptic transmission involves a fast synchronous phase and a slower asynchronous phase of neurotransmitter release that are regulated by distinct Ca(2+) sensors. Though the Ca(2+) sensor for rapid exocytosis, synaptotagmin I, has been studied in depth, the sensor for asynchronous release remains unknown. In a screen for neuronal Ca(2+) sensors that respond to changes in [Ca(2+)] with markedly slower kinetics than synaptotagmin I, we observed that Doc2--another Ca(2+), SNARE, and lipid-binding… Expand
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