Do words hurt? Brain activation during the processing of pain-related words

@article{Richter2010DoWH,
  title={Do words hurt? Brain activation during the processing of pain-related words},
  author={Maria Richter and Judith Eck and Thomas Straube and Wolfgang H. R. Miltner and Thomas Weiss},
  journal={PAIN},
  year={2010},
  volume={148},
  pages={198-205}
}
&NA; Previous studies suggested that areas of the pain matrix of the human brain are recruited by the processing of pain‐related environmental cues such as pain‐related pictures or descriptors of pain. However, it is still sketchy whether those activations are specific to the pain‐relevance of the stimuli or simply reflect a general effect of negative valence or increased arousal. The present study investigates the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of pain‐related, negative, positive… Expand
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