Do unto others or treat yourself? The effects of prosocial and self-focused behavior on psychological flourishing.

@article{Nelson2016DoUO,
  title={Do unto others or treat yourself? The effects of prosocial and self-focused behavior on psychological flourishing.},
  author={S. Katherine Nelson and Kristin Layous and Steve W. Cole and Sonja Lyubomirsky},
  journal={Emotion},
  year={2016},
  volume={16 6},
  pages={
          850-61
        }
}
When it comes to the pursuit of happiness, popular culture encourages a focus on oneself. By contrast, substantial evidence suggests that what consistently makes people happy is focusing prosocially on others. In the current study, we contrasted the mood- and well-being-boosting effects of prosocial behavior (i.e., doing acts of kindness for others or for the world) and self-oriented behavior (i.e., doing acts of kindness for oneself) in a 6-week longitudinal experiment. Across a diverse sample… Expand
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