Do the parasitic Psithyrus resemble their host bumblebees in colour pattern?

@article{Williams2011DoTP,
  title={Do the parasitic Psithyrus resemble their host bumblebees in colour pattern?},
  author={Paul H Williams},
  journal={Apidologie},
  year={2011},
  volume={39},
  pages={637-649}
}
It has been claimed for the parasitic Psithyrus bumblebees that each parasite species resembles closely its particular narrow range of bumblebee host species in colour pattern. The generality of colourpattern resemblance is assessed by applying quantitative tests at three levels of resolution in the detail of the colour patterns. The results show that at all three levels the parasites and hosts are significantly more likely to share similar colour patterns than would be expected by chance in… Expand

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