Do testing effects change over time? Insights from immediate and delayed retrieval speed

@article{vandenBroek2014DoTE,
  title={Do testing effects change over time? Insights from immediate and delayed retrieval speed},
  author={Gesa S. E. van den Broek and Eliane Segers and Atsuko Takashima and Ludo Verhoeven},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2014},
  volume={22},
  pages={803 - 812}
}
Retrieving information from memory improves recall accuracy more than continued studying, but this testing effect often only becomes visible over time. In contrast, the present study documents testing effects on recall speed both immediately after practice and after a delay. A total of 40 participants learned the translation of 100 Swahili words and then further restudied the words with translations or retrieved the translations from memory during testing. As in previous experiments, recall… 
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