Do social parasitic bumblebees use chemical weapons? (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

@article{Zimma2003DoSP,
  title={Do social parasitic bumblebees use chemical weapons? (Hymenoptera, Apidae)},
  author={B. O. Zimma and Manfred Ayasse and Jan Teng{\"o} and Fernando Ibarra and Claudia Schulz and Wittko Francke},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2003},
  volume={189},
  pages={769-775}
}
The bumblebee Bombus (Psithyrus) norvegicus Sp.-Schn. is an obligate social parasite of B. (Pyrobombus) hypnorum L. Behavioural observations indicated that nest-invading B. norvegicus females may use allomones to defend themselves against attacking host workers. However, so far no defensive chemicals used by social parasitic bumblebee females have been identified. We analysed volatile constituents of the cuticular lipid profile of B. norvegicus females. Furthermore, we performed… Expand
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