Do six-month-old infants perceive causality?

@article{Leslie1987DoSI,
  title={Do six-month-old infants perceive causality?},
  author={Alan M. Leslie and Stephanie Keeble},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={1987},
  volume={25},
  pages={265-288}
}
The idea of cause and effect is often assumed to originate in prolonged learning. However, the present findings suggest that 27-week-old infants may already perceive a cause-effect relationship. Reversal of an apparently causal event (direct launching) produced more recovery of attention following habituation than the reversal of a similar but apparently non-causal event (delayed reaction). In both cases the changes in the spatiotemporal properties of the stimuli were identical. Hence the… Expand
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