Do secretions from the uropygial gland of birds attract biting midges and black flies?

@article{MartnezdelaPuente2011DoSF,
  title={Do secretions from the uropygial gland of birds attract biting midges and black flies?},
  author={Josu{\'e} Mart{\'i}nez‐de la Puente and Juan Rivero-de Aguilar and Sara del Cerro and Anastasio Arg{\"u}ello and Santiago Merino},
  journal={Parasitology Research},
  year={2011},
  volume={109},
  pages={1715-1718}
}
Bird susceptibility to attacks by blood-sucking flying insects could be influenced by urogypial gland secretions. To determine the effect of these secretions on biting midges and black flies, we set up a series of tests. First, we placed uropygial gland secretions from blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus broods inside empty nest boxes while empty nest boxes without gland secretions were treated as controls. Blue tit broods, from which we had obtained uropygial secretions, were affected by biting… Expand
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