• Corpus ID: 1601337

Do pregnant women have (living) will?

@article{Sperling2005DoPW,
  title={Do pregnant women have (living) will?},
  author={Daniel Sperling},
  journal={Journal of health care law \& policy},
  year={2005},
  volume={8 2},
  pages={
          331-42
        }
}
  • D. Sperling
  • Published 7 November 2005
  • Law
  • Journal of health care law & policy
Living wills are documents that instruct health care providers about particular kinds of medical care that an individual would or would not want to have if rendered incompetent. Under the American legal system, living wills of pregnant women are not legally binding or enjoy a much weaker effect than those of other women, not to mention those of other men. In Canada, however, the law is silent on this matter. From this silence one can infer either that the legislators were not fully aware of the… 
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References

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    Burch , Incubator or Individual ? : The Legal and Policy Deficiencies of Pregnancy Clauses in Living Will and Advance Health Care Directive Statutes , 54 MD

      Sheikh & Denis A . Cusack , Maternal Brain Death , Pregnancy and the Foetus : The Medico - Legal Implications , 7 MEDICO - LEGAL J . IR

      • 2001