Do peahens not prefer peacocks with more elaborate trains?

@article{Loyau2008DoPN,
  title={Do peahens not prefer peacocks with more elaborate trains?},
  author={Adeline Loyau and Marion Petrie and Michel Saint Jalme and Gabriele Sorci},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2008},
  volume={76},
  pages={e5-e9}
}
Ever since Darwin (1871), the peacock’s train has been cited as the icon of an extravagant conspicuous secondary sexual trait that has evolved through female mate choice. However, Takahashi et al. (2008) recently challenged this idea. They monitored female mate choice during 7 years in a feral peafowl, Pavo cristatus, population in Japan and found no correlation between male mating success and three morphological train traits. They concluded that ‘combined with previous results, our findings… Expand
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Peahens do not prefer peacocks with more elaborate trains
TLDR
It is concluded that peahens in this population are likely to exercise active choice based on cues other than the peacock's train, which is not the universal target of female choice. Expand
Peahens prefer peacocks with elaborate trains
TLDR
Observations of one lek, consisting of 10 males, showed that there was considerable variance in mating success and analysis of female behaviour provided good evidence that this non-random mating is a result of a female preference, supporting Darwin's hypothesis that the peacock's train has evolved, at least in part, as a result. Expand
Experimental and natural changes in the peacock's (Pavo cristatus) train can affect mating success
TLDR
An experimental test of the importance of the peacock's train in determining male mating success supports the hypothesis that the peacocks' train has evolved, at least in part, as a result of female choice. Expand
Variation in the peacock’s train shows a genetic component
TLDR
This study adds to the building body of evidence that high levels of additive genetic variance can exist in secondary sexual traits under directional selection, but further emphasizes the main problem of what maintains this variation. Expand
Variation in the train morphology of peacocks (Pavo cristatus)
TLDR
Relationships indicate that train elaboration may be condition-dependent, and females that prefer males with larger trains may therefore gain good condition males, which may reflect overall genetic quality. Expand
Intra‐ and Intersexual Selection for Multiple Traits in the Peacock (Pavo cristatus)
TLDR
T traits under intra- and intersexual selection in a population of free-ranging common peafowl are investigated and the role of multiple receivers on the evolution of multiple signals is stressed, suggesting that females use multiple cues during mate selection. Expand
Correlates of mating success in Indian Peafowl
TLDR
Indian Peafowls establish display territories in mid-April, and maintain them until the end of the breeding season in September, when molting of train feathers begins (pets. obs.). Expand
A possible non-sexual origin of mate preference: are male guppies mimicking fruit?
TLDR
Results support the ‘sensory–bias’ hypothesis for the evolution of mating preferences by showing both an association between a potential trigger of a mate–choice preference and a sexually selected trait, and also that an innate attraction to a coloured inanimate object explains almost all of the observed variation in female mate choice. Expand
Peacocks with low mating success are more likely to suffer predation
TLDR
If females mate with attractive males because their offspring have a higher chance of survival then it might be expected that preferred males would also show a higher chances of survival, since these males would possess the `good genes'. Expand
Multiple sexual advertisements honestly reflect health status in peacocks (Pavo cristatus)
TLDR
It is shown that both flexible behavioral displays and fixed feather ornaments of peacocks, used by females to choose a mate, honestly reflect health status and are consistent with the idea that multiple signaling might enhance information reliability. Expand
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