Do parent practices to encourage academic competence influence the social adjustment of young European American and Chinese American children?

Abstract

The predominant early childhood education philosophy in the United States views formal academic instruction as inappropriate and harmful to the social development of young children. Chinese American immigrants to the United States, however, have been found to teach their young children in more formal ways, to be more directive, and to structure their children's use of time to a greater degree (C. S. Huntsinger, P. E. Jose, F.-R. Liaw, & W.-D. Ching, 1997). Forty European American (20 boys, 20 girls) and 36 2nd-generation Chinese American (18 boys, 18 girls) 1st- and 2nd-grade children and their mothers, fathers, and teachers participated in the Time 2 data collection of this longitudinal study to assess whether the formal academic environment provided by Chinese American parents is linked to poorer social adjustment in their children. Regressions showed that parents' work-oriented methods influenced academic performance but not social adjustment of their children.

Cite this paper

@article{Huntsinger1998DoPP, title={Do parent practices to encourage academic competence influence the social adjustment of young European American and Chinese American children?}, author={Carol S. Huntsinger and Paul E. Jose and Sharon Larson}, journal={Developmental psychology}, year={1998}, volume={34 4}, pages={747-56} }