Do others judge us as harshly as we think? Overestimating the impact of our failures, shortcomings, and mishaps.

@article{Savitsky2001DoOJ,
  title={Do others judge us as harshly as we think? Overestimating the impact of our failures, shortcomings, and mishaps.},
  author={K. Savitsky and N. Epley and T. Gilovich},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2001},
  volume={81 1},
  pages={
          44-56
        }
}
When people suffer an embarrassing blunder, social mishap, or public failure, they often feel that their image has been severely tarnished in the eyes of others. Four studies demonstrate that these fears are commonly exaggerated. Actors who imagined committing one of several social blunders (Study 1), who experienced a public intellectual failure (Studies 2 and 3), or who were described in an embarrassing way (Study 4) anticipated being judged more harshly by others than they actually were… Expand

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