Do non-nutritive sweeteners influence acute glucose homeostasis in humans? A systematic review

@article{Tucker2017DoNS,
  title={Do non-nutritive sweeteners influence acute glucose homeostasis in humans? A systematic review},
  author={Robin M Tucker and Sze-Yen Tan},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2017},
  volume={182},
  pages={17-26}
}
The human body associates sensory cues with metabolic consequences. Exposure to sweet-tasting sugars - even in the absence of ingestion - triggers physiological responses that are associated with carbohydrate digestion, absorption and metabolism. These responses include the release of insulin and incretin hormones, which work to reduce blood glucose. For this reason, non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) have been posited to trigger similar physiological responses and reduce postprandial blood glucose… Expand
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