Do non-human primates synchronise their menstrual cycles? A test in mandrills

@article{Setchell2011DoNP,
  title={Do non-human primates synchronise their menstrual cycles? A test in mandrills},
  author={Joanna M Setchell and Jeremy R. Kendal and Pola Tyniec},
  journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology},
  year={2011},
  volume={36},
  pages={51-59}
}

Macaque Females Synchronize Sex not Cycles

The results suggest social facilitation of mating synchrony, which explains the high number of simultaneously receptive females, and the low male mating skew in this species, may serve to enhance the benefits of extended female sexuality, and may proximately explain its patterning and maintenance.

Testing socially mediated estrous synchrony or asynchrony in wild baboons

It is concluded that socially mediated synchrony or asynchrony is unlikely to play a significant role in structuring social groups in baboons because when there are more females simultaneously in estrus, even a dominant male is less able to defend them from other males.

Pheromones, feminism and the many lives of menstrual synchrony

Since first proposed in 1971, the theory of menstrual synchrony has been haunted by doubt while gaining greater public visibility. Based on a study of women living in a dormitory, biopsychologist

You Mate, I Mate: Macaque Females Synchronize Sex not Cycles

The results suggest social facilitation of mating synchrony, which explains the high number of simultaneously receptive females, and the low male mating skew in this species, may serve to enhance the benefits of extended female sexuality, and may proximately explain its patterning and maintenance.

The socio-endocrinology of female reproductive strategies in wild Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis)

It is suggested that in response to constraints of reproductive and life-history traits, female Assamese macaques modify and emancipate their sexual behavior from hormonal control, and thereby manipulate and control largely mating and reproductive outcome.

Sexual Selection and the differences between the sexes in Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

  • J. Setchell
  • Biology, Psychology
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2016
This review shows how different reproductive priorities lead to very different life histories and divergent adaptations in males and females and demonstrates how broadening traditional perspectives on sexual selection beyond the ostentatious results of intense sexual selection on males leads to an understanding of more subtle and cryptic forms of competition and choice in both sexes.

Darwin's Legacy: An Evolutionary View of Women's Reproductive and Sexual Functioning

The known variability in ovarian functioning is summarized, the implications of this variability for conducting sex research are considered, and the relative merits of various biomarkers that serve as proxy measurements of a woman's reproductive and hormonal status are evaluated.

Female Reproductive Seasonality and Male Influxes in Wild Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)

A clear relationship between the presence of receptive females and the number of males in the group is found, and evidence that male competitive ability influences male strategies is found.

The Mandrill: A Case of Extreme Sexual Selection

Bringing to life, through detailed descriptions and rich illustrations, the mandrill’s communicatory biology and the functions of its brightly coloured adornments, this book sheds new light on the evolutionary biology of this fascinating primate.

Chemosignals, hormones and mammalian reproduction

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