Do new Access and Benefit Sharing procedures under the Convention on Biological Diversity threaten the future of biological control?

@article{Cock2009DoNA,
  title={Do new Access and Benefit Sharing procedures under the Convention on Biological Diversity threaten the future of biological control?},
  author={Matthew J. W. Cock and Joop C. van Lenteren and Jacques Brodeur and Barbara I. P. Barratt and Franz Bigler and Karel Jozef Florent Bolckmans and Fernando Lu{\'i}s C{\^o}nsoli and Fabian Haas and Peter G. Mason and Jos{\'e} Roberto Postali Parra},
  journal={BioControl},
  year={2009},
  volume={55},
  pages={199-218}
}
Under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) countries have sovereign rights over their genetic resources. Agreements governing the access to these resources and the sharing of the benefits arising from their use need to be established between involved parties [i.e. Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS)]. This also applies to species collected for potential use in biological control. Recent applications of CBD principles have already made it difficult or impossible to collect and export… 

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