Do mites phoretic on elm bark beetles contribute to the transmission of Dutch elm disease?

@article{Moser2009DoMP,
  title={Do mites phoretic on elm bark beetles contribute to the transmission of Dutch elm disease?},
  author={John C. Moser and Heino Konrad and Stacy R. Blomquist and T. Kirisits},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2009},
  volume={97},
  pages={219-227}
}
Dutch elm disease (DED) is a destructive vascular wilt disease of elm (Ulmus) trees caused by the introduced Ascomycete fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. In Europe, this DED pathogen is transmitted by elm bark beetles in the genus Scolytus. These insects carry phoretic mites to new, suitable habitats. The aim of this study was to record and quantify conidia and ascospores of O. novo-ulmi on phoretic mites on the three elm bark beetle species Scolytus multistriatus, Scolytus pygmaeus, and Scolytus… 
Dutch elm disease and elm bark beetles: a century of association
TLDR
Bark beetles of the genus Scolytus Geoffroy are the main vectors of the fungus Ophiostoma ulmi s.l., which causes the Dutch elm disease, and how their interactions could be modified in order to face one of the most destructive diseases ever known in plant pathology is discussed.
FIRST RECORD OF THE MITE Histiostoma ulmi IN SILVER FIR AND INDICATION OF A POSSIBLE PHORETIC DISPERSAL BY THE LONGHORN BEETLE Acanthocinus reticulatus
TLDR
The discovery of H. ulmi in the galleries of the longhorn beetle Acanthocinus reticulatus indicates the possibility of its phoretic association with several beetle carriers: tenebrionid, cerambycid and scolytid beetles.
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TLDR
The number of taxa encountered, covering a relatively small geographical area, indicates that there are many more ophiostomatoid fungi occurring in the boreal forests of Fennoscandia than has previously been recognized.
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TLDR
It is confirmed that mites are important vectors of the Ophiostomatales in China, and the fact that half of the fungal species found were new to science, suggests that the forests of east Asia include many undescribed Ophiobacteria yet to be discovered.
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TLDR
Both D. quadrisetus and V. lyriformis are predatory on bark beetle eggs and larvae and could be useful in biological control programmes, and H. ovalis may be an important vector of fungal spores of ophiostomatoid pathogenic fungi.
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TLDR
Members of the order Mesostigmata frequently use other animals to colonize suitable habitats, and thus their phoretic exploitation of bark beetles is not exceptional, but at the locality with bivoltine beetle populations, however, the number ofphoretic mites per beetle was greater in the spring generation than in the summer generation.
Ophiostomatoid fungi associated with mites phoretic on bark beetles in Qinghai, China
TLDR
The results re-enforce that mites and fungi isolated from galleries of four spruce-infesting bark beetle species in the high altitude forests of Qinghai province, western China should not be ignored in pest risk assessments of bark beetles.
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TLDR
Interestingly, the pathogens for both the ambrosia and bark beetle-associated diseases often have symbiotic relationships with the insects that are not based on phytopathogenicity.
Acarine biodiversity associated with bark beetles in Mexico
TLDR
Dendroctonus frontalis Lindquist and Hunter, 1965 is the bark beetle with the highest reported number of associated mites in Mexico and worldwide, and among the species mentioned in this study, there was an interesting range of feeding habitats and habits.
Phoretic Mite Associates of Mountain Pine Beetle at the Leading Edge of an Infestation in Northwestern Alberta, Canada
TLDR
This study is the first to document the assemblage of phoretic mites on D. ponderosae in Alberta and will help to direct future research on their interactions.
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