Do honeybees have two discrete dances to advertise food sources?

@article{Gardner2008DoHH,
  title={Do honeybees have two discrete dances to advertise food sources?},
  author={K. Gardner and T. Seeley and N. Calderone},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2008},
  volume={75},
  pages={1291-1300}
}
The honeybee, Apis mellifera, dance language, used to communicate the location of profitable food resources, is one of the most versatile forms of nonprimate communication. Karl von Frisch described this communication system in terms of two distinct dances: (1) the round dance, which indicates the presence of a desirable food source close to the hive but does not provide information about its direction and (2) the waggle dance, which indicates the presence of a desirable food source more than… Expand

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