Do female red-winged blackbirds benefit genetically from seeking extra-pair copulations?

@article{Gray1997DoFR,
  title={Do female red-winged blackbirds benefit genetically from seeking extra-pair copulations?},
  author={Elizabeth M. M. Gray},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1997},
  volume={53},
  pages={605-623}
}
  • E. M. Gray
  • Published 1 March 1997
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract Female pursuit of extra-pair copulations was investigated in a western population of red-winged blackbirds,Agelaius phoeniceusPotential genetic benefits to females were considered in this study; potential material gains were examined in Gray (1997Anim. Behav.53, 625–639). In this population, females initiate courtship and copulation outside their social bond, and between 18 and 43% of all breeding females engaged in extra-pair copulations each breeding season. The peak of extra-pair… 

Female red-winged blackbirds accrue material benefits from copulating with extra-pair males

  • E. M. Gray
  • Environmental Science, Biology
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  • 1997
This study is the first to demonstrate that females can benefit materially as well as genetically by copulating outside their pair bond and illustrates the need for manipulative tests to understand fully the reproductive strategies of individuals in populations where social relationships often do not reflect genetic relationships.

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  • Biology
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Old female reed buntings (Emberiza schoeniclus) increase extra-pair paternity in their broods when mated to young males

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...

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  • E. M. Gray
  • Environmental Science, Biology
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In this population of red-winged blackbirds, females appear to use behavioral means to control nestling paternity, which in turn directly affected their mate’s reproductive success, and males were restricted to using strategies that were largely ineffective at preventing the threat of extra-pair paternity.

Female red-winged blackbirds accrue material benefits from copulating with extra-pair males

  • E. M. Gray
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Animal Behaviour
  • 1997
This study is the first to demonstrate that females can benefit materially as well as genetically by copulating outside their pair bond and illustrates the need for manipulative tests to understand fully the reproductive strategies of individuals in populations where social relationships often do not reflect genetic relationships.

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