Do female pigeons trade pair copulations for protection?

@article{LOVELLMANSBRIDGE1998DoFP,
  title={Do female pigeons trade pair copulations for protection?},
  author={Claire LOVELL-MANSBRIDGE and Tim R. Birkhead},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1998},
  volume={56},
  pages={235-241}
}
Male pigeons, Columba livia, employ intense mate guarding and frequent copulation apparently as strategies to ensure their paternity. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefits to females of mate guarding by males and frequent copulation. Field observations showed that females initiated the majority of copulations and females that solicited copulations more frequently were guarded more closely by their partner. Experimental removal of guarding male partners showed that: (1) unguarded… Expand
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