Do feathered dinosaurs exist? Testing the hypothesis on neontological and paleontological evidence

@article{Feduccia2005DoFD,
  title={Do feathered dinosaurs exist? Testing the hypothesis on neontological and paleontological evidence},
  author={Alan Feduccia and Theagarten Lingham‐Soliar and Jonathan R. Hinchliffe},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2005},
  volume={266}
}
The origin of birds and avian flight from within the archosaurian radiation has been among the most contentious issues in paleobiology. Although there is general agreement that birds are related to theropod dinosaurs at some level, debate centers on whether birds are derived directly from highly derived theropods, the current dogma, or from an earlier common ancestor lacking suites of derived anatomical characters. Recent discoveries from the Early Cretaceous of China have highlighted the… 
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