Do early intervention for psychosis services really save money?

@article{Jorm2013DoEI,
  title={Do early intervention for psychosis services really save money?},
  author={Anthony F Jorm},
  journal={Australian \& New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2013},
  volume={47},
  pages={396 - 397}
}
  • Anthony F Jorm
  • Published 1 April 2013
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47(4) References De Leon J, Verghese C, Tracy JI, et al. (1994) Polydipsia and water intoxication in psychiatric patients: a review of the epidemiological literature. Biological Psychiatry 35: 408–419. Dundas B, Harris M, Narasimhan M, et al. (2007) Psychogenic polydipsia review: etiology, differential, and treatment. Current Psychiatry Reports 9: 236–241. Haddad PM, Dursun SM, Haddad PM, et al. (2008) Neurological complications of psychiatric… 

Evidence-based mental health services reform in Australia: Where to next?

TLDR
In the ANZJP, there has been on-going discussion and debate about three reforms in particular: the Better Access scheme, the Healthy Kids Check and the roll-out of early psychosis services.

EPPIC mirage: Cost-effectiveness of early psychosis intervention

  • M. Raven
  • Psychology
    The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 2013

References

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Assessing the cost of early intervention in psychosis: A systematic review

  • A. Amos
  • Medicine, Psychology
    The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 2012
TLDR
The published literature does not support the contention that early intervention for psychosis reduces costs or achieves cost-effectiveness, and increased outpatient costs in early-intervention programmes suggest such programmes may increase costs.

Truth and reality in early intervention

  • P. McGorry
  • Medicine, Psychology
    The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 2012
‘I have seen how much progress early intervention teams have made, how innovative they have been, and the impact they are having. I now believe that early intervention will be the most important and

Counting the cost: Commentary on a systematic review of cost of early intervention in psychosis

  • V. Carr
  • Psychology
    The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
  • 2012
TLDR
Developing and evaluating interventions for individuals with psychotic disorders designed to reduce the impact of community-based exclusion are important, but social interventions to reduced the likelihood of such exclusion are also important and challenging.