Do cosmic-ray-driven electron-induced reactions impact stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change?

@article{Groo2011DoCE,
  title={Do cosmic-ray-driven electron-induced reactions impact stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change?},
  author={Jens Uwe Groo{\ss} and Rolf M{\"u}ller},
  journal={Atmospheric Environment},
  year={2011},
  volume={45},
  pages={3508-3514}
}
  • J. Grooß, R. Müller
  • Published 1 June 2011
  • Environmental Science, Physics
  • Atmospheric Environment

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