Do chitons have a compass? Evidence for magnetic sensitivity in Polyplacophora

@article{SumnerRooney2014DoCH,
  title={Do chitons have a compass? Evidence for magnetic sensitivity in Polyplacophora},
  author={Lauren Sumner-Rooney and James A. Murray and Shaun D. Cain and Julia D. Sigwart},
  journal={Journal of Natural History},
  year={2014},
  volume={48},
  pages={3033 - 3045}
}
Several animals and microbes have been shown to be sensitive to magnetic fields, though the exact mechanisms of this ability remain unclear in many animals. Chitons are marine molluscs which have high levels of biomineralised magnetite coating their radulae. This discovery led to persistent anecdotal suggestions that they too may be able to navigationally respond to magnetic fields. Several researchers have attempted to test this, but to date there have been no large-scale controlled empirical… Expand
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