Do categories have politics?

@article{Suchman2004DoCH,
  title={Do categories have politics?},
  author={Lucy A. Suchman},
  journal={Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)},
  year={2004},
  volume={2},
  pages={177-190}
}
  • L. Suchman
  • Published 1 September 1993
  • Philosophy
  • Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)
Drawing on writings within the CSCW community and on recent social theory, this paper proposes that the adoption of speech act theory as a foundation for system design carries with it an agenda of discipline and control over organization members' actions. [] Key Method I then turn to some observations on the politics of categorization and, with that framework as back-ground, consider the attempt, throughthe coordinator, to implement a technological system for intention-accounting within organizations…

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