Do blue light filters confer protection against age-related macular degeneration?

@article{Margrain2004DoBL,
  title={Do blue light filters confer protection against age-related macular degeneration?},
  author={Tom H. Margrain and Michael E. Boulton and John Marshall and David H Sliney},
  journal={Progress in Retinal and Eye Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={523-531}
}
Current concept of the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration: the role of oxidative stress and inflammation
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A ran-domized, prospective, placebo-controlled study in United States showed that high-dose supplementation of beta-caroten, vitamin C, vitamin E, copper, and zinc significantly slowed the progression of the disease and visual deterioration in patients with AMD.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): pathogenesis and therapy.
  • J. Nowak
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    Pharmacological reports : PR
  • 2006
TLDR
Four processes: lipofuscinogenesis, drusogenesis, inflammation and neovascularization, specifically contribute to the development of two forms of AMD, the dry form (non-exudative; geographic atrophy) and the wet form (Exudative, nevascular).
Age-related maculopathy and the impact of blue light hazard.
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The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), a randomized clinical trial, showed a significantly lower incidence of late ARM in a cohort of patients with drusen maculopathy treated with high doses of antioxidants than in a placebo group, creating a platform for the search for new prophylactic and therapeutic measures to alleviate or prevent photoreceptor and RPE degeneration in ARM.
Intraocular lens short wavelength light filtering
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A review looks at the risks and the benefits of filtering out short wavelength light in pseudophakic patients, which includes ultraviolet, blue and violet wavelengths.
Systemic changes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.
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The results suggest that inadequate systemic immune modulation is an important pathogenic mechanism in the aetiology of AMD, proposing that different mechanisms may underlie the different subtypes of AMD.
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TLDR
The role of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents has transformed the therapeutic approach of the potentially blinding disease “wet AMD” into a more favorable outcome.
Oxidative Stress Induced Damage of the Human Retina: Overview of Mechanisms and Preventional Strategies
TLDR
It is shown that many studies in cell and molecular biology, animal experiments and first clinical trials point to a preferential use of yellow tinted lenses especially in the elderly and ARMD patients, and studies showing that the shortwave part of the visible spectrum of light can be harmful to the retina, especially to the macula and optic nerve are referred to.
Surgery for macular disease
TLDR
The rationale of surgery in both techniques is to effectively restore the choriocapilliaris-Bruch’s-RPE interface beneath the foveal photoreceptors and rescue function before fibrovascular proliferation causes marked ‘irreversible’ photoreceptor loss.
Drugs in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration
TLDR
This review provides an overview of the agents that are in mid-stage phase trials for both exudative (wet) and nonexudative macular degeneration (dry AMD) and the goal is to develop a strategy to slow or stop progressive loss of retinal tissue seen in geographic atrophy, the hallmark of advanced dry AMD.
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