Do birds sleep in flight?

@article{Rattenborg2006DoBS,
  title={Do birds sleep in flight?},
  author={Niels C. Rattenborg},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2006},
  volume={93},
  pages={413-425}
}
  • N. Rattenborg
  • Published 11 May 2006
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Naturwissenschaften
The following review examines the evidence for sleep in flying birds. The daily need to sleep in most animals has led to the common belief that birds, such as the common swift (Apus apus), which spend the night on the wing, sleep in flight. The electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings required to detect sleep in flight have not been performed, however, rendering the evidence for sleep in flight circumstantial. The neurophysiology of sleep and flight suggests that some types of sleep might be… Expand
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