Do athletes need more dietary protein and amino acids?

@article{Lemon1995DoAN,
  title={Do athletes need more dietary protein and amino acids?},
  author={Peter W R Lemon},
  journal={International journal of sport nutrition},
  year={1995},
  volume={5 Suppl},
  pages={
          S39-61
        }
}
  • P. Lemon
  • Published 1 June 1995
  • Biology
  • International journal of sport nutrition
The current recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein is based primarily on data derived from subjects whose lifestyles were essentially sedentary. More recent well-designed studies that have employed either the classic nitrogen balance approach or the more technically difficult metabolic tracer technique indicate that overall protein needs (as well as needs for some specific individual amino acids) are probably increased for those who exercise regularly. Although the roles of the… 
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References

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  • P. Lemon
  • Education
    International journal of sport nutrition
  • 1991
The debate regarding optimal protein/amino acid needs of strength athletes is an old one. Recent evidence indicates that actual requirements are higher than those of more sedentary individuals,
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  • Medicine
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TLDR
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  • Medicine
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TLDR
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TLDR
Protein requirements for athletes performing strength training are greater than for sedentary individuals and are above current Canadian and US recommended daily protein intake requirements for young healthy males.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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