Do Open Source Developers Respond to Competition? The LATEX Case Study

@article{Gaudeul2007DoOS,
  title={Do Open Source Developers Respond to Competition? The LATEX Case Study},
  author={Alex Gaudeul},
  journal={Review of Network Economics},
  year={2007},
  volume={6}
}
  • Alex Gaudeul
  • Published 2007
  • Review of Network Economics
  • This paper traces the history of TEX, the open source typesetting program. TEX was an early and very successful open source project that imposed its standards in a particularly competitive environment and inspired many advances in the typesetting industry. Developed over three decades, TEX came into competition with a variety of open source and proprietary alternatives. I argue from this case study that open source developers derive direct and indirect network externalities from the use of… CONTINUE READING
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