Do Inhaled B2-Agonists have an Ergogenic Potential in Non-Asthmatic Competitive Athletes?

@article{Kindermann2007DoIB,
  title={Do Inhaled B2-Agonists have an Ergogenic Potential in Non-Asthmatic Competitive Athletes?},
  author={Wilfried Kindermann},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={95-102}
}
AbstractThe prevalence of asthma is higher in elite athletes than in the general population. The risk of developing asthmatic symptoms is the highest in endurance athletes and swimmers. Astma seems particularly widespread in winter-sport athletes such as cross-country skiers. Asthmatic athletes commonly use inhaled β2-agonists to prevent and treat asthmatic symptoms. However, β2-agonists are prohibited according to the Prohibited List of the World Anti-Doping Agency. An exception can be made… 
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