Do I Know You? Processing Orientation and Face Recognition

@article{Macrae2002DoIK,
  title={Do I Know You? Processing Orientation and Face Recognition},
  author={C. Neil Macrae and Helen L Lewis},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={13},
  pages={194 - 196}
}
Recognition performance is impaired when people are required to provide a verbal description of a complex stimulus (i.e., verbal-overshadowing effect), such as the face of the perpetrator in a simulated robbery. A shift in the processing operations that support successful face recognition is believed to underlie this effect. Specifically, when participants shift from a global to a local processing orientation, face recognition is impaired. Extending research on this general topic, the present… Expand
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