Do I Hear a Million?

@article{White2004DoIH,
  title={Do I Hear a Million?},
  author={James W. C. White},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={304},
  pages={1609 - 1610}
}
  • J. White
  • Published 11 June 2004
  • Environmental Science
  • Science
Researchers have been using ice core data to steadily push our knowledge of climate change back to earlier and earlier times. In his Perspective, White discusses the importance of the 740,000-year-long record from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica. This is nearly twice the time span previous ice cores have provided and accesses for the first time in an ice core the Mid Bruhnes Event, a fundamental shift in the pattern of climate at about a half-million years ago. When fully… 

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