Do Gun Buybacks Save Lives? Evidence from Panel Data

@article{Leigh2010DoGB,
  title={Do Gun Buybacks Save Lives? Evidence from Panel Data},
  author={Andrew Leigh and Christine Neill},
  journal={Political Economy: Government Expenditures \& Related Policies eJournal},
  year={2010}
}
  • A. Leigh, Christine Neill
  • Published 29 June 2010
  • Engineering
  • Political Economy: Government Expenditures & Related Policies eJournal
In 1997, Australia implemented a gun buyback program that reduced the stock of firearms by around one-fifth. Using differences across states in the number of firearms withdrawn, we test whether the reduction in firearms availability affected firearm homicide and suicide rates. We find that the buyback led to a drop in the firearm suicide rates of almost 80 per cent, with no statistically significant effect on non-firearm death rates. The estimated effect on firearm homicides is of similar… Expand
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We suppose that guns or firearms are subject to an anticipated future buyback program undertaken by the government. A simple linear demand durable-goods monopoly model is then analyzed where theExpand
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