DnaE2 Polymerase Contributes to In Vivo Survival and the Emergence of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

@article{Boshoff2003DnaE2PC,
  title={DnaE2 Polymerase Contributes to In Vivo Survival and the Emergence of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis},
  author={Helena I. M. Boshoff and Michael B. Reed and Clifton E. Barry and Valerie Mizrahi},
  journal={Cell},
  year={2003},
  volume={113},
  pages={183-193}
}
The presence of multiple copies of the major replicative DNA polymerase (DnaE) in some organisms, including important pathogens and symbionts, has remained an unresolved enigma. We postulated that one copy might participate in error-prone DNA repair synthesis. We found that UV irradiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in increased mutation frequency in the surviving fraction. We identified dnaE2 as a gene that is upregulated in vitro by several DNA damaging agents, as well as during… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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This review focuses on different DNA repair systems from mycobacteria and identifies questions that remain in the understanding of how these systems have an impact upon the infection processes of these important pathogens.
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