Dmanisi

@article{Lordkipanidze2018Dmanisi,
  title={Dmanisi},
  author={David Lordkipanidze},
  journal={The International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology},
  year={2018}
}
  • David Lordkipanidze
  • Published 4 October 2018
  • The International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology
1 Citations

References

SHOWING 1-9 OF 9 REFERENCES
Response to Comment on “A Complete Skull from Dmanisi, Georgia, and the Evolutionary Biology of Early Homo”
Schwartz et al. hold that variation among the Dmanisi skulls reflects taxic diversity. The morphological observations to support their hypothesis, however, are partly incorrect, and not calibrated
Earliest Pleistocene hominid cranial remains from Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia: taxonomy, geological setting, and age.
TLDR
Paleontological, archaeological, geochronological, and paleomagnetic data from Dmanisi all indicate an earliest Pleistocene age of about 1.7 million years ago, supporting correlation of the new specimens with the Koobi Fora fossils.
Anthropology: The earliest toothless hominin skull
TLDR
This specimen not only represents the earliest case of severe masticatory impairment in the hominin fossil record to be discovered so far, but also raises questions about alternative subsistence strategies in early Homo.
Earliest human occupations at Dmanisi (Georgian Caucasus) dated to 1.85–1.78 Ma
TLDR
The secure age for D manisi's first occupations reveals that Eurasia was probably occupied before Homo erectus appears in the East African fossil record, and shows that the southern Caucasus was occupied repeatedly before Dmanisi's hominin fossil assemblage accumulated.
A Complete Skull from Dmanisi, Georgia, and the Evolutionary Biology of Early Homo
TLDR
The Dmanisi sample, which now comprises five crania, provides direct evidence for wide morphological variation within and among early Homo paleodemes, implying the existence of a single evolving lineage of early Homo, with phylogeographic continuity across continents.
A New Skull of Early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia
TLDR
The Dmanisi specimens are the most primitive and small-brained fossils to be grouped with this species or any taxon linked unequivocally with genusHomo and also the ones most similar to the presumedhabilis-like stem.
Postcranial evidence from early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia.
TLDR
Newly excavated postcranial material from Dmanisi comprising a partial skeleton of an adolescent individual, associated with skull D2700/D2735, and the remains from three adult individuals shows that the postc Cranial anatomy of the D manisi hominins has a surprising mosaic of primitive and derived features.