Divorce in common murres (Uria aalge): relationship to parental quality

@article{Moody2004DivorceIC,
  title={Divorce in common murres (Uria aalge): relationship to parental quality},
  author={Allison T. Moody and Sabina I Wilhelm and Maureen L. Cameron-MacMillan and Carolyn J. Walsh and Anne E. Storey},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={57},
  pages={224-230}
}
Behavioral precursors of 12 divorces were examined in 30 color-banded pairs of common murres (Uria aalge) over six breeding seasons. Common murres are long-lived seabirds that typically return each year to the same mate and nest site in dense colonies. At least one parent is present continuously from egg lay to chick fledging. Murres, therefore, have considerable opportunities to compare their mates’ parental behavior with that of several familiar neighbors. Previous reproductive success was… 

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