Diving physiology and winter foraging behavior of a juvenile leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx)

@article{Kuhn2005DivingPA,
  title={Diving physiology and winter foraging behavior of a juvenile leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx)},
  author={Carey E Kuhn and Birgitte I. McDonald and Scott A. Shaffer and Julie Barnes and Daniel E. Crocker and Jennifer M. Burns and Daniel P. Costa},
  journal={Polar Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={29},
  pages={303-307}
}
Diving physiology and at-sea behavior of a juvenile leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) were opportunistically measured in the Antarctic Peninsula during winter 2002. Total body oxygen stores were estimated from measures of hematocrit, hemoglobin, myoglobin, and total blood volume and were used to calculate an aerobic dive limit (ADL). Movement patterns and diving behavior were measured by equipping the seal with a Satellite Relay Data Logger that transmitted data from 8–31 August 2002. The seal… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Summer diving and haul‐out behavior of leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx) near mesopredator breeding colonies at Livingston Island, Antarctic Peninsula
TLDR
Visual observations and comparisons of diving activity between and within years suggest individual-based differences of foraging effort by time of day, and dive and video data indicate that in addition to at-surface hunting, benthic searching and facultative scavenging are important foraging strategies for leopard seals near coastal mesopredator breeding colonies. Expand
Movements and dive behaviour of two leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx) off Queen Maud Land, Antarctica
TLDR
Data suggest that a portion of the adult leopard seals may spend the winter mainly in open water, off the edge of the pack ice, where they primarily hunt near the surface, as well as penguins, young crabeater seals and a variety of fish are important prey items. Expand
Long term movements and activity patterns of an Antarctic marine apex predator: The leopard seal
TLDR
The successful use of micro geolocation logging sensor tags to track the movements, and activity, of four leopard seals for trips of between 142–446 days including one individual in two separate years shows an understanding of leopard seal ecology is vital in the management of the Southern Ocean resources. Expand
Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) as bioprobes: Fine-scale measurements of oceanographic properties using an instrumented large marine predator
Abstract Obtaining high resolution data on the physical and biological conditions in marine ecosystems is needed to better understand the impacts of environmental variability. The instrumentation ofExpand
Olfaction at depth: Cribriform plate size declines with dive depth and duration in aquatic arctoid carnivorans
TLDR
It is found that aquatic carnivoran species from two lineages that independently reinvaded marine environments (Pinnipedia and Mustelidae), have significantly reduced relative CP than terrestrial species, suggesting that CP reduction in carnivorans is an adaptive response to shifting selection pressures during secondary invasion of marine environments, particularly to foraging at great depths. Expand
Size and distribution of oxygen stores in harp and hooded seals from birth to maturity
TLDR
Comparisons with other phocid species suggests that the pattern of blood and muscle development in the pre- and post-natal periods varies with terrestrial period, and that muscle maturation rates may influence the length of the postweaning fast. Expand
Modelling predation by transient leopard seals for an ecosystem-based management of Southern Ocean fisheries
TLDR
It is suggested that rare apex predators like leopard seals may control, and may depend on, populations of mesopredators dependent on prey species targeted by fisheries, and predatory impacts and community control may vary throughout the predator's geographic range, and differ across ecosystems and management areas, depending on the seasonal abundance of the prey and the predator’s dispersal movements. Expand
Seals : Trophic modelling of the Ross Sea
Seals are the most common marine mammals in the Ross Sea (Ainley 1985). Given that some species of seal are known to predate on and/or compete with toothfish, it is possible that they will beExpand
Life under water: physiological adaptations to diving and living at sea.
TLDR
This review covers the field of diving physiology by following a chronological approach and focusing heavily on marine mammals, and traces ideas as they were first suggested, tested, modified and in some cases, abandoned. Expand
Responses of Antarctic pack-ice seals to environmental change and increasing krill fishing
The compound effects of changing habitats, ecosystem interactions, and fishing practices have implications for the management of Antarctic krill and conservation of its predators. For AntarcticExpand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Winter habitat use and foraging behavior of crabeater seals along the Western Antarctic Peninsula
We quantified the winter and spring movement patterns and foraging behavior of adult crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophagus), and the influence of sea ice and bathymetry on their foraging behavior.Expand
Spatial movement of adult leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx) in Prydz Bay, Eastern Antarctica
TLDR
This study has focused on adult females and animals at the extreme southerly range of the leopard seal, highlighting the importance of understanding and reporting age structure and distribution when discussing animal spatial behaviour. Expand
Notes on winter feeding of crabeater and leopard seals near the Antarctic Peninsula
TLDR
Analysis of stomach contents of crabeater and leopard seals collected in the pack ice west of the antarctic Peninsula in August–September 1985 suggest that krill were not abundant or widely distributed in the area at the time the seals were collected. Expand
Seasonal occurrence and diet of leopard seals ( Hydrurga leptonyx ) at Bird Island, South Georgia
TLDR
Seasonal haul-out patterns and diet of individually marked leopard seals were investigated at Bird Island, South Georgia during the 1983–96 winters, finding considerable inter-annual variation in abundance. Expand
Foraging ecology of southern elephant seals in relation to the bathymetry and productivity of the Southern Ocean
TLDR
It is suggested that the physiological requirements of feeding and digestion reduced the aerobic dive limit of elephant seals, and long distance travel to relocatable hydrographic or topographical features, such as shelf breaks, may allow large predators to locate prey more consistently than from mid-ocean searches. Expand
Development of the Blood and Muscle Oxygen Stores in Gray Seals (Halichoerus grypus): Implications for Juvenile Diving Capacity and the Necessity of a Terrestrial Postweaning Fast
TLDR
The PWF represents an integral component of the physiological development of diving capacity in phocid seal pups; however, newly independent phocids still appear to have limited diving capabilities at the onset of foraging. Expand
Blood Volume and Diving Ability of the New Zealand Sea Lion, Phocarctos hookeri
TLDR
New Zealand sea lions have the highest blood volume yet reported for an otariid, which supports the hypothesis that they have a physiological capability suited to their unique diving behavior. Expand
Moult energetics of the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris)
TLDR
Energy expenditures suggest that, similar to data for harbour seals, the moult period is a time of relatively low energy expenditure. Expand
Physiological and behavioral determinants of the aerobic dive limit in Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) Pups
TLDR
Plasma metabolite levels were more highly regulated in older pups, and together with the increasing aerobic dive limit, suggest that Weddell seal pups are not refined divers until after they are weaned, and that their diving ability continues to develop over several years. Expand
Distribution of zooplankton on the continental shelf off Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, during Austral Fall and Winter, 2001
Abstract The Marguerite Bay region of the Western Antarctic Peninsula is known to support a large population of krill during the summer and is hypothesized to be a site of successful overwintering ofExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...